Posts Tagged ‘healthy child’

4th of July Patriotic Pops

 

4th of July Patriotic Pops

Natural Dyed Easter Eggs

Naturally Dyed Easter Eggs

This Easter try something new and natural by dyeing your Easter eggs with natural coloring.   Making natural dyes isn’t just a way to achieve more earthy colors, and better looking eggs but by leaving the harsh food-colorings and egg decorating kits on the shelf in the store, you are making a healthier choice for you and your family.

Natural Egg Dye Recipes

Have A Happy, Healthy Easter!

What Ingredients Are In Your Baby Care Products?

Baby Oil

If you’re like most parents of babies, you know the importance of good nutrition so you read baby food labels and carefully avoid dangerous preservatives and artificial colors.  But, how much time do you spend reading the labels of your favorite baby care products?  You may think that because a product is marketed for babies it must be safe but unfortunately, that is not always the case.  In fact, some popular brands of baby care products, including shampoos, washes, lotions, ointments, and wipes, contain potentially dangerous ingredients.

While it would be nice to think that the FDA, Food and Drug Administration, is protecting our children from potentially dangerous chemicals, that just isn’t so.  Baby care products are considered to be cosmetics by the FDA and with the exception of color additives, ingredients in cosmetics are not subject to FDA approval.  Individual cosmetic and personal care product companies are responsible for determining the safety of their products prior to placing them on the market.   Basically, the FDA is only involved in ensuring proper labeling of cosmetics.   It’s sad to say but companies can even include a dangerous ingredient in a product as long as the proper warning label is included.   So the bottom line is that as a parent you MUST read the labels!

To find out what is in your baby care products, go to the  Environmental Working Group Cosmetics Database

 

 

Homemade Vegetable and Fruit Soak

Vegetable and Fruit Soak

The vinegar cleans and the salt will draw out any little bugs and dirt

 

 

World Autism Awareness Day

LightItUpBlueLogo_Horizontal1

Each April 2, Autism Speaks celebrates Light It Up Blue along with the international autism community, in commemoration of the United Nations-sanctioned World Autism Awareness Day.

I am Lighting It Up Blue for Autism Awareness. Learn how you can participate, too!
Go To: lightitupblue.org

Do You Think It’s Time To “Rethink Your Drink”?

Rethink Your Drink

If you’re not sure,

just look at this Science Project and the amount of sugar these drinks contain.

Do You Know Skin Cancer Is Highly Preventable?


May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month, a time to increase awareness of the importance of the prevention, early detection, and treatment of skin cancer.  Skin cancer is chiefly a lifestyle disease and is highly preventable.

“About 90 percent of nonmelanoma skin cancers and 65 percent of melanoma cases are associated with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun,” says Perry Robins, MD, President of The Skin Cancer Foundation. “Everyone, regardless of skin color, should make staying safe in the sun a priority and incorporate sun protection measures into their daily life.”

Here is how to reduce your risk of skin cancer:

  1. Seek the shade, especially between 10 AM and 4 PM when the sun is strongest. An extra rule of thumb is the “shadow rule.” If your shadow is shorter than you are, the sun’s harmful UV radiation is stronger; if your shadow is longer, UV radiation is less intense.
  2. Do not burn. A person’s risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had five or more sunburns at any point in life.
  3. Avoid tanning and UV tanning booths. UV radiation from tanning machines is known to cause cancer in humans, and the more time a person has spent tanning indoors, the higher the risk. Those who make just four visits to a tanning salon per year can increase their risk for melanoma by 11 percent, and their risk for the two most common forms of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, by 15 percent.
  4. Cover up with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses. Clothing can be your most effective form of sun protection, so make the most of it with densely woven and bright-or dark-colored fabrics, which offer the best defense. The more skin you cover, the better, so choose long sleeves and long pants whenever possible.
  5. Use a broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher every day. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.
  6. Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply every two hours or immediately after swimming or excessive sweating.
  7. Keep newborns out of the sun. Sunscreens may be used on babies over the age of six months, but they should also be protected by shade and clothing. Children are very sensitive to ultraviolet radiation— just one severe sunburn in childhood doubles the chances of developing melanoma later in life.
  8. Examine your skin head-to-toe every month. While self-exams shouldn’t replace the important annual skin exam performed by a physician, they offer the best chance of detecting the early warning signs of skin cancer. If you notice any change in an existing mole or discover a new one that looks suspicious, see a physician immediately.
  9. See your physician every year for a professional skin exam.