Archive for the ‘children’ Category

4th of July Patriotic Pops

 

4th of July Patriotic Pops

What Ingredients Are In Your Baby Care Products?

Baby Oil

If you’re like most parents of babies, you know the importance of good nutrition so you read baby food labels and carefully avoid dangerous preservatives and artificial colors.  But, how much time do you spend reading the labels of your favorite baby care products?  You may think that because a product is marketed for babies it must be safe but unfortunately, that is not always the case.  In fact, some popular brands of baby care products, including shampoos, washes, lotions, ointments, and wipes, contain potentially dangerous ingredients.

While it would be nice to think that the FDA, Food and Drug Administration, is protecting our children from potentially dangerous chemicals, that just isn’t so.  Baby care products are considered to be cosmetics by the FDA and with the exception of color additives, ingredients in cosmetics are not subject to FDA approval.  Individual cosmetic and personal care product companies are responsible for determining the safety of their products prior to placing them on the market.   Basically, the FDA is only involved in ensuring proper labeling of cosmetics.   It’s sad to say but companies can even include a dangerous ingredient in a product as long as the proper warning label is included.   So the bottom line is that as a parent you MUST read the labels!

To find out what is in your baby care products, go to the  Environmental Working Group Cosmetics Database

 

 

World Autism Awareness Day

LightItUpBlueLogo_Horizontal1

Each April 2, Autism Speaks celebrates Light It Up Blue along with the international autism community, in commemoration of the United Nations-sanctioned World Autism Awareness Day.

I am Lighting It Up Blue for Autism Awareness. Learn how you can participate, too!
Go To: lightitupblue.org

Do You Know Skin Cancer Is Highly Preventable?


May is Skin Cancer Awareness Month, a time to increase awareness of the importance of the prevention, early detection, and treatment of skin cancer.  Skin cancer is chiefly a lifestyle disease and is highly preventable.

“About 90 percent of nonmelanoma skin cancers and 65 percent of melanoma cases are associated with exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation from the sun,” says Perry Robins, MD, President of The Skin Cancer Foundation. “Everyone, regardless of skin color, should make staying safe in the sun a priority and incorporate sun protection measures into their daily life.”

Here is how to reduce your risk of skin cancer:

  1. Seek the shade, especially between 10 AM and 4 PM when the sun is strongest. An extra rule of thumb is the “shadow rule.” If your shadow is shorter than you are, the sun’s harmful UV radiation is stronger; if your shadow is longer, UV radiation is less intense.
  2. Do not burn. A person’s risk for melanoma doubles if he or she has had five or more sunburns at any point in life.
  3. Avoid tanning and UV tanning booths. UV radiation from tanning machines is known to cause cancer in humans, and the more time a person has spent tanning indoors, the higher the risk. Those who make just four visits to a tanning salon per year can increase their risk for melanoma by 11 percent, and their risk for the two most common forms of skin cancer, basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma, by 15 percent.
  4. Cover up with clothing, including a broad-brimmed hat and UV-blocking sunglasses. Clothing can be your most effective form of sun protection, so make the most of it with densely woven and bright-or dark-colored fabrics, which offer the best defense. The more skin you cover, the better, so choose long sleeves and long pants whenever possible.
  5. Use a broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 15 or higher every day. For extended outdoor activity, use a water-resistant, broad spectrum (UVA/UVB) sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher.
  6. Apply 1 ounce (2 tablespoons) of sunscreen to your entire body 30 minutes before going outside. Reapply every two hours or immediately after swimming or excessive sweating.
  7. Keep newborns out of the sun. Sunscreens may be used on babies over the age of six months, but they should also be protected by shade and clothing. Children are very sensitive to ultraviolet radiation— just one severe sunburn in childhood doubles the chances of developing melanoma later in life.
  8. Examine your skin head-to-toe every month. While self-exams shouldn’t replace the important annual skin exam performed by a physician, they offer the best chance of detecting the early warning signs of skin cancer. If you notice any change in an existing mole or discover a new one that looks suspicious, see a physician immediately.
  9. See your physician every year for a professional skin exam.

How Can You “Live Healthier”, If You Don’t Have Enough To Eat?

 

 

Most Americans have traditionally thought of “hunger” as something that happens over in Africa or Asia, but that is simply not the case anymore.  There are tens of millions of Americans that would be going without enough food if it weren’t for the food stamp program, school meal programs, food pantries, soup kitchens and the kindness of religious organizations.

 

 

There is a new documentary airing April 14, 2012 at 8:00/7:00c on the Food Network, “Hunger Hits Home,” part of an ongoing partnership between Food Network and Share Our Strength’s No Kid Hungry Campaign to end childhood hunger in America by 2015, takes a first-hand look at the crisis of childhood hunger in America through the eyes of the parents, children, anti-hunger activists, educators and politicians on the frontlines of the battle. Without the help from all of us, nothing will change.  NO child in this country or for that matter, any country, should have to suffer the pain of hunger.  Please watch to find out what YOU can do to be part of the solution…  “Change Begins With You”

World Autism Awareness Day

“On December 18, 2007, the United Nations General Assembly adopted resolution 62/139, tabled by the State of Qatar, which declares April 2 as World Autism Awareness Day (WAAD) in perpetuity. Her Highness Sheikha Mozah Bint Nasser Al-Missned, Consort of His Highness Sheikh Hamad Bin Khalifa Al-Thani, the Emir of the State of Qatar, supported the campaign for a World Autism Awareness Day through the current 62nd UN General Assembly Session, garnering consensus support from all United Nations Member States.

This UN resolution is one of only three official disease-specific United Nations Days and will bring the world’s attention to autism, a pervasive disorder that affects tens of millions. The World Autism Awareness Day resolution encourages all Member States to take measures to raise awareness about autism throughout society and to encourage early diagnosis and early intervention. It further expresses deep concern at the prevalence and high rate of autism in children in all regions of the world and the consequent developmental challenges.

World Autism Awareness Day shines a bright light on autism as a growing global health crisis. WAAD activities help to increase and develop world knowledge of the autism epidemic and  impart information regarding the importance of early diagnosis and early intervention. Additionally, WAAD celebrates the unique talents and skills of persons with autism and is a day when individuals with autism are warmly welcomed and embraced in community events around the globe.

By bringing together autism organizations all around the world, we will give a voice to the millions of individuals worldwide who are undiagnosed, misunderstood and looking for help. Please join us in our effort to inspire compassion, inclusion and hope.”

World Autism Awareness Events

Do You Really Want That Perfect Golden Tan?

Most Americans, including up to 80% of people under age 25, think they look better with a tan.

A tan is the skin’s response to injury caused by UV exposure. Tanning occurs when ultraviolet rays penetrate the epidermis, the skin’s outer layer causing the production of melanin as a response to the injury. Chronic exposure to ultraviolet light, both natural and artificial, results in a change in the skin’s texture, causing wrinkling and age spots of the skin. Thus, tanning to improve appearance is ultimately self-defeating.

Skin cancer is epidemic in the United States, with more than 1 million new cases diagnosed annually. Although the numbers of new cases of many other types of cancer are falling or leveling off, the number of new cases of melanoma is growing. In the past, melanoma mostly affected people in their fifties or older, but today dermatologists see patients in their twenties and even late teens with this type of cancer. Experts believe this is partly due to an increase in the use of tanning beds and sun lamps, which have high levels of UVA rays.

Here are some tips to protecting your skin from sun damage.

  1. Wear sunscreen with an SPF of at least 15 every day, even on cloudy days and when you don’t plan on spending much time outdoors.
  2. In the direct sun, wear a sunscreen with a higher SPF, like SPF 30.
  3. Use a broad-spectrum sunscreen that blocks both UVA and UVB rays. Ideally, it should also be hypoallergenic and noncomedogenic so it doesn’t cause a rash or clog your pores and give you acne.
  4. Apply sunscreen thickly and frequently. If you’re not sure you’re putting on enough, switch to one with a higher SPF.
  5. Reapply sunscreen every 2 to 3 hours and after swimming or sweating.
  6. Take frequent breaks. The sun’s rays are strongest between 10:00 AM and 4:00 PM.

 So I ask you again, Do you really want that perfect golden tan?

BefoRE Sun

Baby Care Sunscreen SPF 30+